September 10, 2021

This week I have a lot of questions for you, and I hope you’ll be able to help me answer them.

1.

What is the dry-fruit craze, and why are people so mad?

A dry-fruits craze has been sweeping the country since 2012.

Dry fruit was traditionally sold as a way of making jam or a filling for fruit pies, but dried fruit has been gaining popularity in the US.

It’s now widely used as a topping on smoothies and salads, or even on a baked goods, such as a banana bread crust.

According to the New York Times, people are “worried that the sweet smell of dried fruit may cause allergies.”

2.

Is this a marketing ploy to attract young people to the grocery store?

According the National Farmers Union, dried fruit is a low-cost food, and as such, it’s been gaining in popularity with younger generations.

And according to the Food Marketing Institute, it has “been gaining in sales among people between the ages of 18 to 24, as well as younger adults.”

3.

Is the dryness of the fruit bad for you?

Yes.

The dried fruit industry claims that it helps “stretch the shelf life” of fruit, so it’s not necessarily bad for the consumer.

But it does contain chemicals, which are known to cause cancer.

Dried fruit contains sugar, which has been linked to insulin resistance, and is linked to a higher risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

4.

What are some dry-food ingredients?

Many people believe that dried fruit can help prevent obesity and diabetes, but they’re not convinced by the studies that support their claims.

Many experts agree that dried fruits aren’t really healthy.

5.

Do dried fruit and other fruits contain more calories than fresh fruit?

No.

Cranberries, mangoes, plums and apples are all a lot smaller than dried fruit, and they’re also all full of sugar.

6.

Can dry fruits help you lose weight?

Not if you don’t eat fruit and veggies, but eating them is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, obesity and other types of chronic diseases.

7.

Is there a health benefit to eating dried fruit?

No.

Dried fruits have no nutritional value and are packed with toxins and pesticides.

8.

Are you allergic to dried fruit or any of its ingredients?

No. 9.

Can dried fruit make you sick?

No, it doesn’t.

10.

Is dried fruit healthy for your heart?

Yes. 

According to some studies, a diet high in dried fruit actually raises the risk of developing high blood pressure, type 2 diabetics, obesity, type 1 diabetes, heart disease and other conditions.

11.

What else can I do to help the dry fruits craze stop?

The food industry is in a frenzy.

So, why are so many people buying dry fruits?

For one, dried fruits are cheap, so there are fewer people buying them. 

They also cost less than fresh fruits. 

And the dried fruit industries are lobbying for more food and beverage taxes to help fight the dry foods craze.

“The dry- fruit industry is pushing for the federal government to raise taxes on the dry food industry to pay for the research and development costs of the FDA’s new ‘Dry-Fruit Alert,’ which will warn consumers of the health hazards associated with dry fruit,” a report from the New America Foundation stated.

 Dry fruits also help the industry’s bottom line.

As an industry that sells packaged food, the dry products industry spends a lot on advertising and promotions, which help the company generate revenue and keep prices high.

Even if dried fruit isn’t good for you—and it isn’t—you’re not the only one.

In fact, the Food and Drug Administration is trying to crack down on the industry, and some experts say the government is considering a new approach to the dry and sweet foods craise.

If you or someone you know is struggling with dry fruits and other processed foods, call the National Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (NFSCME) at 1-800-227-2711.